Sunday, June 25, 2017

Here we stand / In a special place / What will you do here?

Your humble Devil has finally felt the need to refresh his quill for a brief post.

The thing is, you see, that whilst the British people voted the right way in opting for Brexit, the contempt and derision aimed at them—this demos in democracy—has been as depressingly predictable as ever.

As I alluded to before, I have spent a good deal of the last decade wandering up and down the country engaging with housing associations (and their tenants) for work: that means that I have seen a great many of the old industrial heartlands in the kind of close-up that I never dreamed of doing.

And, largely, I make a point of going into pubs to hear people talk—because it is incumbent on any political animal to understand the point of view of those outside their immediate sphere of influence. Especially since my general sphere is middle-class, white, and prosperous-city-centric.

Here is the point, children: there is a colossal rift in this country between the "haves" (London and the Home Counties) and the "have-nots" (everywhere else). Osborne, in his clumsy Oxbridge way, at least recognised this—even if his Northern Powerhouse remains totally undefined—whilst most other people of my acquaintance seem to be living in a fucking fantasy world.

I have significant concerns about how we can progress—and, in any case, to do so, we need to acknowledge the problems. Part of the rank stupidity of Remainers is that they seem to be blissfully unaware that there are any problems—and for that reason Brexit remains the best choice we could have made (even were it not the will of 17.5m British people).

So, without further ado, and via the excellent Tim Newman, let me introduce you to Tucker Carlson. OK. So. I don't know who Tucker Carlson is really (apparently he is currently a Fox presenter), but I don't think that I have ever heard anyone encapsulate all of my personal concerns and beliefs quite so eloquently. Or at all, actually.

You should watch this. And do not think that it is just "all about America"—it isn't. Watch it, and then come back...


Like Carlson, I don't really have to care: like Carlson, I live in the city of our country's federal government so I'm alright, Jack. But I think that we should all care—if only because there is trouble brewing.

Let's look at just a couple of his points:

  • when Carlson talks about those outside Washington DC, think those outside of London;
  • when he talks about the "middle-class" in the US, it is equivalent to the formerly-prosperous working- and middle-classes in the UK;
  • Carlson points out that the Republicans are anti-Obamacare but did not know what they would replace it with—well, I think that we are familiar with that argument from Brexit, no?
  • and whilst the "over-correction" that he talks about regarding Trump has not happened in the USA, it has happened here—with Corbyn.

But note that the difference in the UK, over Carlson's implied scenario, is that the over-correction to Corbyn has not come from the 'neglected classes'—it has come from the affluent classes to whom Corbyn has, essentially, promised cash monies. And these people are, largely, the worst and most affluent people in the country, e.g. students, etc.

Back on the night of the 2015 election, a friend invited me to take part in a debate at the Bethnal Green Working Men's Club: I was introduced as "a man whose views I hope will enrage you..."

The audience was largely composed of students. So, yes, my views did enrage them. Especially when asked if I was pro-tuition fees, I replied "why should a bin man pay for you to sit on your arse 'studying' philosophy for three years?"

They booed me as I left.

And I was glad.

I didn't want to be cheered by those cunts.

But the point is that all of the problems that Carlson identifies are present in our country too. A very early contributor to the Kitchen, Martin Kelly, railed against the wage-lowering potential of low-skilled immigrant labour, for instance.

Like Carlson, it does not mean that I think that—on balance—immigration is a bad thing. But I do think that we—that is, the British people—should be allowed to debate it without being called "bigots", "racists", or "xenophobes". And I do think, if the British people are not convinced by the arguments, that they should be allowed to vote "no" and to have that vote respected.

And I do think that, ultimately, "democracy is the pressure relief valve" that stops countries collapsing. And I do think that this valve has been denied us for a long time.

Luckily, our politicians have not been the most enthusiastic for EU integration: which is why we do not have Marine le Pen or Geert Wilders. But if you think that it was never going to happen here (or that it will not happen in France or the Netherlands), then you are part of the problem.

Actually, you are most of the problem.

WAKE UP, you stupid arsehole—smell some of that delicious coffee*.

*Coffee, by the way, that is tariff free when imported to the EU as raw beans but which carries a massive tariff if processed—a policy that is designed to keep Developing Countries poor, and to protect massively rich EU companies (with equally huge lobbying budgets) from competition.**

** Are you the kind of person who supports the EU, but who then buys Fair Trade coffee? Then you are an unspeakable cunt. Fuck off.

1 comment:

Dominic A said...

A fine return to form.

Of course those who need to open the minds and learn from this will just dismiss it. Idiots.