Thursday, July 14, 2011

Quote of the Day...

... comes from The Appalling Strangeness because he's absolutely fucking right.
Don’t get me wrong, there’s a whole host of laws that need to be repealed in order to enhance life in this country, and I would love to see that happen. But before it does, we need to stop the fuckers in Parliament adding to the sum total of legislative bollocks in this country. And as our starting point, suggesting that new restrictions on the press and public inquiries into the alleged misdeeds of News International are fucking pointless when what they did is already illegal.

I used to level this particular argument at NuLabour; and then I levelled it at Boris when he enacted his ridiculously authoritarian Tube booze ban; and now, it seems, I need to spell it out to this supposedly liberty-loving Coalition...

We don't need more laws: just ENFORCE THE LAWS THAT WE ALREADY HAVE.

You cunts.

3 comments:

Roger Thornhill said...

Further, anyone who attempts to bribe a policeman must know pretty well that they are "open for business" beforehand.

The police needs some clearing out and any attempt to have national databases should be laughed out of town.

Andrew Zalotocky said...

I see this as a demonstration of the extent to which politicians live in a world of symbols that has no connection to reality. They spend most of their time worrying about how they will be perceived and what the media will say about them, not about what effect their decisions will have in the real world. For them politics is an abstract game of signalling and positioning.

So for the political class legislation is not a concrete, practical thing that has to be enforced. Passing a law is a purely symbolic act that has no purpose other than to associate them with whatever sentiment is currently fashionable. They don't think about what happens after that because the consequences all happen outside of their reality, in the one the rest of us inhabit.

Oliver Beatson said...

I have to agree particularly strongly with the concluding paragraph.