Sunday, October 26, 2008

LA Dinner

Your humble Devil attended the Libertarian Alliance Conference dinner this evening, and it was all jolly good fun. I met up with David Farrer, who I haven't seen since the dying days of my Edinburgh life, and a number of other good people too.

There was an air of positivity, a feeling that maybe, just maybe, our time is coming. Libertarians tend to be a patient and sedate lot—there was no air-punching, no whooping and hollering (although there was substantial applause when Brian Mickelthwait was (entirely deservingly) given a Lifetime Achievement Award)—but there was an upbeat air to the evening—an air that was distilled into the TPA's Matthew Eliot's speech.

All round, it was a rather nice evening. Until I got home and found that my flat had been ransacked.

Luckily, they seem to have taken nothing of significance apart from the video camera that I got from 18 Doughty Street (easy come, easy go) and my MacBook. They appear to have examined my Mac Pro and my passport but, luckily, left both. And I carry most of my portable valuables with me, I am glad to say.

Naturally, I hadn't got around to getting contents insurance; ah, well, no one's fault but my own (and everything on that machine was backed up)—but this is the second MacBook that I have had stolen (the first was nicked, literally, from under my arse—or, rather, the bench it was perched on—at the 2007 Edinburgh Fringe). The most irritating thing is that I shall have to go and change all of my passwords (although, again, I had not bookmarked most of the secure sites that I go to).

All of this was made possible by the fact that the block of flats is still surrounded by scaffolding (I live on the third floor): the thieving fuckers appear to have come in through the bedroom window: they are metal, warped, and freshly painted and thus quite difficult to secure, coupled with the fact that the heating makes the flat like a fucking furnace. I shall be making a (no doubt pointless) complaint about the poor security measures on said scaffolding.

Is it worth reporting to the police? I don't know: I've found that the police are not generally interested in victims of crime, frankly, and it won't help me get my laptop back. It might provide some kind of insurance if there are any further repercussions though.

Would I like to put wires on all entrances to the flat, with enough electricity running through them to kill instantly any other intruders? Were it feasible, definitely. In a libertarian state, I would have the right to defend my life, liberty and property in any way that I might see fit—ah well, one can dream...

Anyway, so that's my car and my flat done in the space of a couple of months (having had no problems for eighteen months previously): has the price of crack suddenly gone through the roof, or something?

12 comments:

Obnoxio The Clown said...

Bummer mate. It's definitely worth reporting to the police though. Once they have your report, they can ignore, misrepresent it in the statistics and fuck you around for a couple of days before ignoring you.

And you weren't insured as well. :o(

hsld said...

Bastards. Sorry to hear that.

Devil's Kitchen said...

Cheers.

Oh well, at least they didn't shit in my bed. I think...

[goes to check]

Nope.

And it does give me an excuse to start saving for one of those lovely new MacBooks...

DK

Jock Coats said...

Oh Bugger - what a nasty end to what was a good evening. Nice to meet you, if only briefly!

Your "captcha" string for this post is "suffer" rather appropriately!

Jock

TheFatBigot said...

Sorry to hear it Mr Kitchen.

I once encountered a burglarist in FatBigot Towers. On being challenged he said "Sorry mate, wrong house, I thought this was my house, I got confused." It didn't seem worthwhile asking him whether he habitually enters his own home by climbing in through a first floor window.

Managed to usher him out through the door without getting stabbed, but was shaking for days. Horrid business.

Henry Crun said...

Are you sure it was a burglary, or just made to look that way DK.

We might just be starting to worry a few people.

The Filthy Smoker said...

Sorry to hear that, DK. What a pisser. Scaffolding is supposed to be alarmed these days, isn't it?

Strange that they didn't swipe your passport. I thought you could get good money for them. Perhaps no one wants to live here any more.

Do report it to the police, though.

Old Holborn said...

I'm with Henry on this one.

They know where you live and you do have a habit of letting the Blogosphere know when you won't be at home.

PS. Any spooks thinking of visiting Farqham Hall whilst I am perambulating outside Parliament on November 5th will need to subdue the dogs first. I've also wired up a few door handles to the mains and filled one room with Zyklon B.

Anonymous said...

Sounds like kids after shiny things easily hidden under a coat to flog for a few quid.

Make sure you add extra security, they may well have told others what they saw in your flat and you may have another visit.

Making man-traps is illegal, but if yobs will insist on stealing faulty equipment that pose a fire / shock hazard that was destined for the tip, well...

Where does the Libertarian Party stand on legalising guns?

Anonymous said...

DK, you have quite rightly become a mighty pain in their collective arses, so it might be worth sweeping for bugs as well.

I have taken to setting up micro cameras around the house, which I only switch on when I go out. They are broadcasting using WiFi and collected and recorded by a neighbour, but as its broadcast wireless, the useless spooks will never know which one. haha.

ade said...

Nightmare - been there, done that; when I lived in East London some troglodyte nicked my digicam & laptop. I wasn't too bothered about the stuff (it was old, and of little monetary value), but the feeling of violation took a while to pass.

Anonymous said...

Crack?
Cannabis?
Heroin?
Alcohol?
Boredom?

This day and age it could be for fucking candi-floss.