Monday, March 03, 2008

Labour is corrupted

It seems that the Labour Party is busy soliciting for more funds, and it is government policy that is for sale. [Emphasis mine.]
Labour has resumed a secret courtship of influential donors before new funding rules are introduced to cover the party from future sleaze allegations, The Times has learnt.

Labour fears being left behind by the Tories in building up their war chest to fund the next general election. Labour, now £20 million in debt, generated only £580,000 from individual donors in the last quarter of last year, while Tory fundraisers brought in £9.8 million over the same period.

Jon Mendelsohn, Mr Brown’s leading fundraiser, is inviting small businessmen as potential donors to a series of private dinners to mingle with Cabinet ministers. They have been told that they could help to shape the next Labour manifesto.

Now, what's that saying about when businessmen get together it is always to conspire against the consumer? Let us be clear: the Labour Party is selling government policy to its donors and it has always done so.

One of the very first examples of this was also one of the very first NuLabour sleaze accusations: the Bernie Ecclestone affair. In return for £1 million from Ecclestone, NuLabour exempted Formula 1 from the ban on tobacco advertising.

And this will always happen when political parties need such big donations: they will sell policy. In short, as long as legislators have the power to legislate, they will always be bought: every man has his price.

The solution is to allow the legislators to legislate on almost nothing at all and thus minimise the amount of influence that is for sale.

5 comments:

Ed said...

DK, the legislators are already on your wavelength: they are handing the power to legislate to others so that they won't be in this position. I didn't think you liked the EU though?

Devil's Kitchen said...

Ed,

Do you think that business lobbies the EU any less than they lobby our own government? Because one of the few factors that can affect EU legislation is big business.

Oh, yes, and those special interest groups that the EU hands money to so that they can lobby it.

DK

Ed said...

Of course not, I was teasing! But once all the decisions are made by El Presidente (who will be paid handsomely and will enter into many book deals once his time has passed) he won't need to take bribes so we can all live in a pure, corruption-free Utopian Europe.....

Mmm.

Devil's Kitchen said...

Oh, well, all businesses will be nationalised by that point anyway, so there won't be any corruption at all.

Just like the morally pure and uncorrupted USSR... ;-)

DK

jgball said...

Lobbying in the EU. http://www.dw-world.de/dw/article/0,2144,3103416,00.html Makes our lot look like amateurs.