Monday, February 11, 2008

Prostituting totalitarianism

And now what the fuck is going on here?
MINISTERS want to block the phone numbers of prostitutes who advertise their services in newspapers and telephone booths in an attempt to stifle the illegal sex trade.

Police forces would identify suspected prostitutes to the telephone companies, which would be required to cut off their numbers.

What the... I mean... I... Corwhumph! (Being an exclamation that only readers of the Jennings books might recognise.)

Timmy sums the situation up nicely.
A telephone company is a private business. A legal one I might add. And prostitution is also a legal business.

How in fuck can ministers assume to intervene in a private contract between two entirely legal businesses in this manner?

And Mark Wadsworth follows up in the comments.
Oh yes, and shut down the newspapers in which they advertise, prosecute the printers who do those thoroughly entertaining cards you see in ‘phone boxes, jail doctors who treat prostitutes for aiding and abetting, burn down any property which has ever been used as a brothel, make Durex only available to married couples etc. etc.

That’ll fix it.

There really is nothing more to add, except to say that the people by whom we are ruled are complete fucking arseholes—and dangerous arseholes at that. Have they run out of things to ban already? Surely not.

The government has no justification for fucking about in the private affairs of private individuals or private companies: fuck them, fuck them right in the ear.

If this law should come in, I am going to produce a whole load of those postcards—advertising sex—and then I am going to put the telephone number of every MP that I can find onto those cards.

After all, the only—and crucial—difference between those prostitutes who advertise in 'phoneboxes and those fucking little whores in the House of Commons is that those turds in the House take our money whether we want to use their services or not.

Time to sharpen the cockroaches, excite the Candiru fish and then, after nature has had its merry way and the MPs' screaming has died to a mere whimper, hang them—hang them all.

5 comments:

Anonymous said...

Woe to the misogynistic oppressor! Glory and power to the comrades of the anti-patriarchal feminist cadres! Death to the capitalists who exploit our sisters!

This crackdown on the phallocratic, phallocentric exploiters of Womyn is long overdue. In the name of equality, all womyn must be liberated from their legal careers as sex workers! Their clients must be liquidated and the womyn themselves sent to political re-education camps to be taught how their behaviour negatively impacts both their fellow womyn and the very course of the revolution itself.

All power to the party!

Broon prevails!

Umbongo said...

"If this law should come in, I am going to produce a whole load of those postcards—advertising sex—and then I am going to put the telephone number of every MP that I can find onto those cards."

Brilliant quite brilliant, DK - you've surpassed yourself! Further to another of your posts: I trust you will include the home phone numbers of every senior police officer in your publishing venture.

ENGLISHMAN said...

Where can we get the addresses,telephone numbers of all MPs,police and publish them on the web? It was very effective in the states last year,and once they are not so anonomous they might sing a different tune to the people they purport to represent.

Anonymous said...

Put up the numbers of MPs who employ family members, rip off tax-payers through 2nd home payments, policemen who shoot electricians in the face, all of them.

Anonymous said...

This is likely to be a phantom proposal anyway, since BT tried and failed to do something similar a few years ago. It proposed cutting off prostitutes that were costing BT money by forcing it to pay cleaners to remove advertising cards from phone boxes. At one stage, BT claimed it was spending more than £250,000 per annum dealing with this problem which affected more than 1,000 boxes in central London - more than 13 million cards were collected each year.

However, the Courts decided that BT was not permitted to withdraw its service from prostitutes that paid their bills.

Since, this is likely to be a “human rights” issue, there is every chance that even primary legislation would be insufficient to allow BT to choose which customers it is prepared to provide a service to.