Monday, January 07, 2008

Clarkson arse

It seems that Jeremy Clarkson has been caught out somewhat.
TV presenter Jeremy Clarkson has lost money after publishing his bank details in his newspaper column.

The Top Gear host revealed his account numbers after rubbishing the furore over the loss of 25 million people's personal details on two computer discs.

He wanted to prove the story was a fuss about nothing.

Whoops! He's looking a bit of an arse now, eh?
But Clarkson admitted he was "wrong" after he discovered a reader had used the details to create a £500 direct debit to the charity Diabetes UK.

Clarkson published details of his Barclays account in the Sun newspaper, including his account number and sort code. He even told people how to find out his address.

"All you'll be able to do with them is put money into my account. Not take it out. Honestly, I've never known such a palaver about nothing," he told readers.

Uh-huh.
But he was proved wrong, as the 47-year-old wrote in his Sunday Times column.

"I opened my bank statement this morning to find out that someone has set up a direct debit which automatically takes £500 from my account," he said.

"The bank cannot find out who did this because of the Data Protection Act and they cannot stop it from happening again."

Well, I might suggest that you change your bank account then, Jeremy. Oh, and were you to press charges, I am pretty sure that the police would be able to force the bank to disclose the details of whoever set up the Direct Debit. But then you would look like a total twat.

You know, sometimes the news can brighten your day...

15 comments:

JuliaM said...

Fair's fair. He did cough to it, and admit he was wrong, and change tack.

Would that our political class had his balls...

Longrider said...

Snap - I just finished commenting on this one. As juliam says; he was big enough to fess up, so fair do's for that. Also, in a way, he's done us all a service...

The Great Simpleton said...

Perhaps NO2ID should give him a medal for service rendered to the cause?

Roger Thornhill said...

As JuliaM and LR, I too blogged earlier that he has the balls to fess up and as such it proves the risk for us all and that his bank did not notify him of the new DD, which might be a good idea.

It is quite refreshing for someone to own up. We did not see Greenpeace doing that recently over biofuels as seen in this blog. Maybe they should follow JC's example.

thud said...

He still has the anti american slant of many media based Brits...so untill he sees who our friends are..sod him!

Anonymous Coward said...

I'm half-and-half. On the one hand, he's the last of a dying breed: TV presenters who talk pleasantly enough about subjects they're interested in. On the other hand, the look on his face must have been a fucking picture.

A N Other said...

JC's mistake and his resultant loss rather shoots holes in the arguments of those who might defend the 'All in one' ID Cards and the UK Governments recent data losses. "Nothing to fear if you've nothing to hide."

Guffaw, splutter.

E said...

I had my wallet nicked yesterday at 1pm. 45 minutes later someone was trying to buy £2400 worth of Euros from a local post office. The person doing this had the pin number to both cards. I hadn't used either card all morning, the pin numbers are not my date of birth or anything obvious like that and I don't write the number down and leave it in my wallet, so how did that happen?

I am told it is possible to read pin numbers off cards somehow is this possible?

Mark Wadsworth said...

"The bank cannot find out who did this because of the Data Protection Act"

So the DPA is there to protect criminals, a bit like the HRA?

Roger Thornhill said...

e: It is more than possible. The chip on the card contains the pin.

Umbongo said...

roger thornhill

But surely the banks wouldn't lie to us about (sorry, overstate) how (in)secure chip & pin is.

FlipC said...

"The bank cannot find out who did this because of the Data Protection Act and they cannot stop it from happening again."

The bank cannot find out who did this because from the bank's perspective they already know - it was one Mr J. Clarkson.

To be fair this shouldn't be about Clarkson's red face, but about the banks' methods of dealing with Direct Debits.

If it was done on-line then someone has his pass-codes (so unlikely). If it was done on paper then his signature was forged and should have been picked up by his bank. If it was done over the phone then why didn't the bank send him a letter to confirm it when they got it?

Point the guns at the right target for this mess - the banks.

Anonymous said...

He's a good guy. Goes to show the good guys are also buffoons...

john b said...

Clarkson was absolutely right in the first place about his main point, which is that you can't nick the money using the info he provided (only transfer it to organisations that are members of the direct debit scheme, which doesn't include Dave The Lagos ID Thief, and therefore is unlikely to be of much interest to crooks).

The DPA point was garbled by the Times - if a crime were reported the police would be able to access the logs, but since Clarkson doesn't want the chap to be arrested he's not reporting a crime, and therefore the bank can't just randomly give him the data.

prince albert of lagos - nigeria said...

In a case like this with Direct Debits the bank must reimburse the customer immediately and then pursue the fraudster. Anyway JC can afford the donation so f*** him!