Wednesday, December 19, 2007

Just one referendum. Give it to me...

Here's another petition for a referendum. However, this one has a bit of a difference: it is EU-wide and, I'm sorry to say, the UK is doing appallingly badly for signatures.

It's one of the easiest to sign and, quite frankly, the fact that the UK has fewer signatures than just about every other country is a bit of an embarrassment.

The countries with the most signatures are Denmark, Austria and Malta. Even Malta is whipping us, for fuck's sake, and there's only about seven people living there!

So, go sign. Provided you agree that the people of the EU should have a say, of course.

If you don't believe that, do feel free to tell us all why in the comments...

8 comments:

Surreptitious Evil said...

Done. The graph of signatures per 100k population is just embarrassing.

The Great Simpleton said...

Done, but I smell a rat.

This is a referendum for the next EU Treaty, which those fuckwits in Brussels will treat as not the "Constitution by any other name".

So what will they do? The next treaty will be something like the "Harmonisation of Public Holidays Treaty", which will give everyone 10 extra days of paid holiday. Once this gets approved in Referendums we will be told - "Look, there is widespread public appeal for EU integration", and off they will go to plot their next raid on our freedoms.

Bastards, the fucking lot of 'em.

Holly said...

That's a very interesting irony. Europe uniting against the European Union!

I happen to be one of the rare characters on here who believes that the EU is a very good idea in principle, executed horrendously badly. So as far as I'm concerned this is a fairly good example to support my argument that some form of integration is a good idea, just not the insanely bureaucratic and inefficient form it currently takes.

Anonymous said...

If you had a referendum, you'd just vote 'No', wouldn't you?

You need to trust the politicians - the cleverest and most selfless of people - to make the right decision for you.

Good God, DK, the way you thump your tub about referenda, one would think you didn't understand that the politicians know best. The politicians know what's good for you. This is probably because they're a higher form of life, more evolved than you.

But, in any case, trust your betters to make the decision for you. They'll get the constitution just like they've got everything else right.

Europe - it's what's for breakfast.

Yorkielass said...

Right? aligning with Arabs which will end up with a revived caliphate sure politicians know best!
What lines their own pockets!
SIGNED, AND IT HAS BEEN PASSED AROUND TO BLOGGERS SIOE AND LE-RESISTANCE............

John Trenchard said...

here's another one. with a bit more clout as its backed Vaclav Klaus, president of the Czech Republic.


http://www.freeeurope.info/

verity said...

I think the reason the British are lagging in adding their signatures is, they are afraid of the state.

It's a terrible thing to say about a country which was once the freest in the world, but I think people are frightened to sign. Many of those extra tens of thousands of public sector workers can be spared from street football coordinating and "real napppy outreach" coordinating and translating public park notices into Somali and the like to trawl through lists of who has signed and make notes.

Cookie said...

The reason the British are lagging is that we know there is no point. A million could sign - it will make no difference: those who support the Master Plan KNOW that there are millions, maybe a majority, who oppose the project: and they don't give a shit. Whatever the democratic opposition, they will do what they want to do anyways. There were laws in place forbidding all of the transfers of powers to another body without consultation with the electorate, but successive governments, in their wisdom (along, in the case of the UK, with the Queen who signed them), did so. Why? Maybe they believed doing so was the right thing to do. Maybe the lure of the gravy train was too much ... who knows? But do so they have done.
It will be interesting to see what happens in the coming decades in a post-democratic Europe.