Friday, May 11, 2007

Jon Worthless*

Jon Worth often pops up on 18 Doughty Street, usually coming across as one of those rampant EUphiles that think that if they just SHOUT loudly enough, everyone will agree with them. His basic way of supporting the EU seems to be attacking the stupidity of some EUsceptics (and, I'll admit, there are plenty of those).

Today, Jon picks up on a very old story, and then makes a stupid conflation.
Red tape, regulation, burdens on British business. The number of times we hear that in the British press when complaints are made about Brussels. I was hence dumbstruck today when the tables have been turned and the reaction is still negative. See this from the Birmingham Post for example, and a very poor article from the BBC here.

For what it's worth (and without having read the Directive to see if there's a sting in the tail), I think that this is a good thing. Yes, let the market decide how large a loaf should be. In practice, I suspect that nothing much will change, as baker's are hardly going to go out and buy lots of new equipment, but I could be wrong.
16 MPs in Westminster do not like this as they fear it will end the British tradition of baking bread in certain sizes. What a load of rubbish! If the consumers want a traditonal loaf, I’m sure the market will be able to provide that. If people want smaller or larger loaves, then those will be available too.

Quite right, Jon; let the consumer decide. If only that held true for every other aspect of the EU, eh? Jon was doing so well though, and then...
We really cannot have our bread and eat it—complain about over-regulation all the time, and then also grumble further when the EU de-regulates!

Er... Jon, who is "we"? Businesses complain about red tape—of which there is an awful lot that emanates from the EU (and is then gold-plated by our fuckwit, interfering mandarins. But that's an argument for another time)—because they have to bear the cost of adhering to it; it damages their businesses.

That sixteen MPs, who have probably never run a business—in fact, probably never been employed by a business, given the political careerist nature of the bastards these days—complain about these regulations does not mean that business is complaining.

And I'm afraid that conflating the two—even if it does give Jon the chance to indulge in a little wordplay. Chortle—is being just slightly dishonest.

Oh, as an addendum, Jon is utterly against referenda on principle. What a surprise that a supporter of the EU should take a principled stand against direct democracy.


* Yes, yes, I know it's childish, but I had to do it. A bit like Jon's bread/cake jibe, really.

6 comments:

haddock said...

"end loaf sizes in the UK that have existed since the 13th century".
400 and 800 gram loaves....I think you will find that this tradition dates back only to the last time the EU fucked about with our heritage; I'm fairly sure in the 13th Century most of the countries in the EU did not even exist... and if they did they would have been told to fuck off and mind their own business.

Ross said...

"end loaf sizes in the UK that have existed since the 13th century".

If you want to be picky, the UK didn't exist in the 13th century either ;)

Jon Worth said...

I would like to point out a few things...

(1) Your sense of humour is really lousy. I've never heard that cheap jibe about my name before.

(2) I am opposed to referendums across the board - for local issues, national issues and European issues. This has nothing to do with me being in favour of the EU or not. Referendums in the UK have simply been used as a tool to get things out of general election campaigns, and that's not right.

(3) On the bread story - I have more of a problem with the press negatively reporting the story than the 16 MPs. It seems there has to be a negative take about any EU story, regardless of the content.

Anonymous said...

Worth is a tosser this much is true

Little Black Sambo said...

"There has to be a negative take about any EU story."
You're not wrong there, Jon.

Trixy said...

You're right, Jon. It's almost as lousy as calling someone a 'tedious little man' because they weren't being convinced of the 'benefits' of the EU, no matter how loud you shouted and presented the underside of your forearms.